Jobs are scarce all over the US, but one of the reasons Austin’s been such a popular destination to move to is that it’s managed to maintain job growth despite the recession. Austin is proud of their strong economy and the fact that they’ve been able to provide an increasing number of jobs, especially as new denizens continue to relocate into the city. Last year, the Austin metro area saw a gain of 44,500 added jobs, and Austin is the fourth fastest growing major metro area in the US. With Texas’s support for business growth and the economic freedom of not having any state taxes, Austin is confident its job growth will continue, providing a solid economic floor for its citizens.

Job Growth by the Numbers

Austin boasts a diverse range of sectors experience job growth, with leisure and hospitality seeing the highest percentage increase in the past year while wholesale trade, construction and natural resources are seeing the highest growth. Persons employed in the metro area has increased by a solid 3.8%, impressive especially considering that the national unemployment rate is hovering around 5%.

Diversity of Career Options

Especially for those used to the metro areas of the coasts, the flexibility and depth of the job market in Austin may come as a pleasant surprise. From startups to engineers to artists to self-starters, the economic culture of Austin is rich and varied; no one is locked into an ironclad career path, and many careers are expansive and integrate various skill sets and experiences. There are lots of options for those who know that a traditional 9 to 5 office job isn’t for them, as well as fulfilling and secure opportunities for those who know exactly what they want in a career and would like to stay there until retirement, regardless of the field they’re in. The job market in Austin is dynamic and broad, encompassing a wealth of career choices for its citizens, and Texas’s business and tax policies are in place to provide a solid foundation.

Self-Employed Workers Welcome

Austin is also a welcoming city for self-employed workers of all kinds, for the same reason that it’s fertile ground for startups to grow. Everyone who’s ever been self-employed knows that taxes can be a major burden, more so than for people who are working more traditional jobs — so it’s more than convenient that Texas has no personal income or state taxes. It’s perhaps part of the reason why self-employed people seem drawn to Austin; its rate of self-employment among workers is relatively high, ranked tenth among the 50 largest metro areas for self-employment. It’s a city that supports you with networking opportunities and a social network of other self-employed people in a career choice that can often feel isolating and risky. Austin is invested in keeping itself weird, and part of that is having a community based around sustainable choices, careers included.